Pelvic Floor

Pelvic floor disorders occur when the muscles or connectived, weakened, or develop too much tension. The Pelvic Floor program at University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Medical Center (UM UCMC) specializes in diagnosing and treating pelvic floor disorders through a comprehensive approach and by providing patients with the best possible care in a comfortable environment.

Some of the most common diagnoses associated with pelvic floor dysfunction include:

Incontinence
Millions of people suffer silently from incontinence. They may be too embarrassed to discuss the problem and may often learn to live with a pelvic floor disorder and the incontinence that can result, despite the fact that there are more treatment options available today than ever before. Minimally invasive surgical procedures are often used to treat the most common type of incontinence, stress urinary incontinence. Medications may assist with reducing urge urinary incontinence. However, there are also specialized non-surgical, therapeutic treatments that can manage both types of incontinence such as pelvic floor physical therapy. Treatment options include biofeedback, bladder retraining, core strengthening and other therapeutic exercise.

Pelvic Pain
Pelvic pain is described as pain in the pelvis, perineum, or lower abdomen area and may feel like an aching or burning sensation. There can be many reasons that both men and women experience persistent pelvic pain. Diseases or disorders of the pelvic organs, trauma, persistent tension, and infection can all be predisposing factors. Pain may present itself in the abdomen, pelvis, lower back, gluteal region, tailbone or genitals. There may be pain with urination, defecation, menstrual cycles, intercourse, and sitting. Physical therapists can perform skilled evaluations to determine how dysfunction in these areas may be contributing to your pain. They use manual skills to address spasms and muscle tightness, or targeted exercises to improve muscle strength. Other treatment strategies may include biofeedback, the retraining of muscles, postural training, and strengthening of the abdominal core muscles.

Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Pelvic organ prolapse is a condition in which there is a weakening of the ligaments that support the organs of the pelvis or weakness in the pelvic floor. This can allow the organs of the pelvis (the uterus, bladder, bowel, or rectum) to slip downward into the vagina. Symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse include a sensation of heaviness, falling out, pain, pain with intercourse, or difficulty urinating or defecating. Dr. Harry Johnson, Director of Urogynecology and Pelvic Reconstruction at the University of Maryland Medical Center, offers many successful treatments as well as surgical options for these conditions. Pelvic floor physical therapy can often be beneficial as a first line treatment option. Patients are instructed in specific pelvic floor muscle strengthening exercises to improve organ support and protect the organs during activity and exercise. Core strengthening exercises are also critical. Many patients experience significant symptom reduction with pelvic floor physical therapy.

University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Medical Center offers a wide range of therapies which may begin with an initial and thorough one-to-one consultation with a physical therapist.

Based on the individual's needs, physical therapy treatment sessions may include:

  • Manual therapy techniques
  • Biofeedback training for muscle strengthening or relaxation
  • Behavior modification strategies
  • Ultrasound and/or electric stimulation
  • Individualized stretching or strengthening exercises
  • Comfort measures and exercises to do at home

Meet our team:

    Julianne Neal
Harry Johnson, MD
Director, Division of Urogynecology and Pelvic Reconstruction at the University of Maryland Medical Center
University of Maryland Upper
Chesapeake Medical Center
510 Upper Chesapeake Drive,
Suite 509

For an appointment, call
410-879-7730

Dr. Johnson specializes in stress urinary incontinence and pelvic floor prolapse in females. The minimally invasive procedures available today make a difference in the quality of life for patients.

  Kelly Huestis, PT, MPT
Clinical Coordinator
Pelvic Floor PT Program

University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Medical Center
510 Upper Chesapeake Drive,
Suite 509

Phone: 443-643-3257

Kelly Huestis is an APTA certified pelvic floor physical therapist. She helps individuals with pelvic floor disorders alleviate their discomfort and regain their independence. The plan of care is very personalized offering relief, decreased pain, and a return to normal function.

  Julianne Neal, DPT, OCS
Certified Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist and Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist
University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Medical Center
510 Upper Chesapeake Drive,
Suite 509

Phone: 443-643-3257

Julianne Neal is an APTA certified pelvic floor physical therapist as well as board certified in the specialty of orthopaedics. She helps individuals with pelvic floor disorders alleviate their discomfort and regain their independence while incorporating her orthopaedic experience.

         

 

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